Whiskey & Wisdom

If Not Now, When? With the Owners of Uncommon Boutique

November 30, 2022 Dalton, Troy, Jack Episode 43
Whiskey & Wisdom
If Not Now, When? With the Owners of Uncommon Boutique
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Show Notes Transcript

This week we bring on the owners of Uncommon Boutique, Dalton, Jack, and Troy. We discuss the highs and lows of starting a business, how to find the perfect location for retail, and how working with the community is a staple of their business.

Wednesday through Friday we will be holding a drawing for a $100 gift card to Uncommon Boutique!

Saturday through Monday we will have a raffle for Walton's Distillery Swag Bag and Bourbon! 

Follow Uncommon Boutique:
@uncommonboutiquenc

Support the show

Thank you all for listening to this week's podcast! If you enjoy listening please consider rating, following, and reviewing the show.

How to find us:
Whiskey & Wisdom: @whiskey.and.wisdom
Chris Kellum: @ctkellum
LinkedIn: Christopher Kellum
Tyler Yaw: @tyler_yaw_
LinkedIn: Tyler Yaw

Chris:

Welcome back everybody. This week you have your constant co-host, Tyler, y'all, and myself, Chris Kellen. And this is a fun week for us because we have a double sponsorship, a double giveaway. There we go. Yeah. First we partnered with Walton's Distillery up in Jacksonville, North Carolina. And they gave us a bottle of the EM Walton Straight Bourbon Whiskey. It's single Barrel 90 Proof. This is actually something different that we'll be tasted throughout the episode. They gave us a little swag bag, and then we reached out to the boys over at. Uncommon Boutique. Correct. I see their shirts say u u b, so like my head was like unbroken, crazy. We invited them on and they also decided to throw some swag at us or at you guys technically.

Tyler:

Yeah. Unfortunately not at us, but outta all of our listeners, a $100 gift card for Uncommon Boutique. And you guys are right across the street from Target, correct? That's right. Yeah. So I know especially the listeners out there with wives and girlfriends, you're probably over there a lot anyway, so might as well go over and stop that uncommon and not waste all your time in Target.

Chris:

Oh, for sure. So we'll give you more details on how to win these things near the end or in the middle, just to throw people off so that way they don't just like stay to the middle. Right, true or fast forward But yeah.

Tyler:

But yeah, let's introduce everyone here first and then we'll take our first sip. So right to the right

Jack:

of me, we have. My name is Jack and I am co-owner of Uncommon Boutique.

Troy:

My name is Troy Poland and I'm also a co-owner of Uncommon Boutique.

Dalton:

And last but not least this is Dalton and I'm also co-owner of Uncommon Boutique.

Tyler:

This is also the first time that we've had three guests on the podcast at

Chris:

once. Yeah, more

Dalton:

the merrier. Well, yeah,

Troy:

but let's try

Tyler:

this Walton's Distillery here.

Dalton:

Cheers. Cheers guys.

Tyler:

I didn't mean to do that. I inhaled when I

Chris:

drank it. Yeah, it's definitely one of those. Mind you, we did a Sunday morning episode and we haven't really had too much to eat beforehand. So Tyler's mental is not prepared for whiskey drinking just yet.

Tyler:

No. I was like, oh, I have to do the breathing technique that Angela taught us and inhaled it. when to drink

Chris:

it. That's why I gave up on that. I'm like, my brain does not work well enough for me to be like, if I inhale, I'm gonna swap it. Yeah.

Troy:

Just like that.

Jack:

It's also 9:00

Dalton:

AM Yes. Yeah, exactly.

Chris:

But yeah, Walton's is kind of nice. They're, like you said, they're based up in Jacksonville, North Carolina. And it is a family owned company, Mr. Walton. Donald G. Walton Jr. Owns a company and works with the people out. I'm sure I wanna

Tyler:

say he's a lawyer. Yeah, so he's an attorney. The, the story's actually really funny with the Walton's distillery up there. So originally back in the days of moon shining and bootlegging and all of that, his extended family was, or may or may not have been very involved in the moonshine business and bootlegging. And so his uncle, who the owner, now his uncle was actually a moon shiner and when they started to do some more moonshine, he was getting older and everything. And of course his nephew was an attorney and he was looking to sell it to someone and he was like, Hey, I mean I'm an attorney. I can't be doing any legal moon shining as my side business here. He said, I'll be more than happy to take it over, but we have to do it. The legal. And so that's kind of how the, the actual business start started. And they're up there, they kind of outskirts of Jacksonville. It's a really cool distillery because they try to keep it as close to the roots as possible. It's as close to the original recipe. Recipe for all of their moon shines and their whiskey out there. And the guy who gave us the tour was hilarious too. He said it's as close to the original as you can get, minus some of the raccoon P which obviously made it in there when you were doing it out in the middle of the woods with no regulation. So he goes, I'm sure that changed the taste a little bit, but it's still good nonetheless.

Chris:

Yes. But talking about like a family get together and building a brand, I mean, I feel like that's what you guys are doing. I mean, you're not technically blood related. But some of y'all are family now, right?

Dalton:

I mean, we, we all live together now, so Yeah. So that makes sense though. Yeah. I mean it was Kind of determining where we wanted to open the shop up. I've lived here in Wilmington for seven years and I was like, you know, me and my wife live here. Yeah. And so I was like, let's just open up the shop here. I was like, you know, Wilmington's an untapped market. Yeah. And you know, I have a bunch of friends that are into sneakers and street wear and the, you know, the community of Wilmington's. Very local friendly. Yeah. It's all about the, you know, people here love local businesses and small businesses. And my wife was generous to open up the house to yeah. Two my friends and say, yeah, they can live with us. That's what

Tyler:

begs the question, where are you guys originally from then before moving into Wilmington?

Troy:

So, I'm originally from High Point. And like Dalton said, we just kind of moved on a whim. It all happened like so fast cuz originally we were thinking about opening a store next summer. Oh, okay. And we had done some extensive research. We had gone to Charleston looking at places we had looked. In, in Georgia Atlanta, Savannah. And we kind of could just kept pushing it off as like, okay, we just need to find the right place to sign a lease. Right. And then that's, you know, Dalton was like, let's just open up shop here in Wilmington. Yeah. You know, there's a lot of people that support local businesses and the shoe market is pretty much untapped here. Mm-hmm. And we've been seeing that just in the small amount of time that we've been open. That's awesome.

Jack:

Yep. And I'm also from High Point and we knew that the Piedmont and even like the Charlotte area was overcrowded. Oversaturated, okay. So the coastal North Carolinas was probably the only option. And I think it speaks a lot that we, we passed up on Charleston and places in Georgia to stay home and in Wilmington. Yeah. And we're so thankful for the community supports thus far, and. We're happy to be here.

Tyler:

Yeah. And actually, so you're the one that got everyone else into the sneaker game, right? I

Jack:

guess I was the, one of the originals considering I started when Nike Elite socks were popular and people were matching with the shoes. Yeah. I was selling socks off of my twin bed and at home on eBay. And my dad even had to install a bigger mailbox just to ship out my holiday packages. But then I found myself spending too much money on shoes and I thought, okay, well let me get into Jordan's. And I've worked with numerous stores across North Carolina as they've popped up in Greensboro, Winston, Charlotte and I thought, now's the time to take the leap and just do it ourselves and have fun with it. So That's awesome.

Tyler:

So, You're the next one in line right? To getting into sneakers and everything.

Troy:

So how, how did you get involved? So I got involved in college. I've always been a fan of sneakers. I remember wanting Jordans growing up, but never really had the opportunity to, right. And then working a couple jobs during college, I finally like saved up enough money. Freshman year I worked on a farm for the entire summer and had just got enough money for the, the Yeezy Pirate blacks, at least by Kanye West, the first, one of the first drops, and ended up getting a pair. So really from that day on, it kind of just spurred into this obsession of shoes, which has now led into a business. But I met Jack through a mutual friend of mine because Jack was into shoes and he was like, Hey man, you know, you need to get in touch with this guy. He's getting, you know, multiple shoes per release and Oh wow. I think he could definitely help out. And from pretty much that conversation, Jack and I have gone to multiple sneaker cons. We've consigned at multiple stores. And Jack's also introduced me to Dalton and like it ties everything together.

Jack:

Yeah. But even before then, we went, we missed each other by a year at the same middle school. So I left Oh, wow. At sixth and I think he joined in seventh. So we, we'd always been somewhere close, just never knew each other.

Tyler:

That's crazy. That's kind of the story for all of you guys that just kind of always kind of missing path and everything. And finally, sneakers is what brought you all together. Yeah, pretty much. That's really cool. So, how'd you get in the sneaker game?

Dalton:

Do? So I kind of like, honestly, YE was the first shoe. Like all my buddies that I worked with, they all had like the three 50 s and I was always so, like, I always beat my shoes mm-hmm. and so it was like, I don't wanna spend a lot of money on a shoe. And then I kind of got into the kind of the artistic aspect of it and the design aspect and kind of could appreciate the shoe. And then when I graduated college, I started a job. I was like, you know what? I'm investing in a nice pair. I got my first pair of three 50 s. Got another one, got another one. And I was like, all right, well now I'm not wearing 'em. I was like, so I was like, they're worth something. And so found a group on Facebook and like put, you know, put 'em for sale on there. And I was like, man, I was like, I just bought these, wore 'em and sold 'em for more than I paid for. Almost like, this is a good way to make some money. Exactly. And then, you know, ever since then, I, like, we just start entering draws for shoes and, you know, kept hitting. And then I like the first like time I actually hit a really good shoe. I like taxied Jack. I was like, Hey, I just hit this cuz I knew Jack was into 'em, right. And he was like, he's like, if you ever like, need help getting more, he's like, let me know And then it was spiraled. I had a, we bought, me and my wife bought our house. I had an entire room full of shoes. Oh wow. And you know, finally, now it's. I gotta move all that out. And my wife's like, we, we got our house back. But then now people are living there. Right. But yeah. Honestly for me it was kind of like Troy, like kind of the interest in shoes. Mm-hmm. kind of navigated me into selling shoes because it was more of a hobby to afford what I wanted. Right. That makes

Tyler:

sense. Yeah. So it's, it's funny you bring that up too. Cause I was thinking the same thing when I was bringing you guys on. So like, I can appreciate the rarity and the artistic value of the shoes and the sneakers. I'm the same way though. Like if I buy a pair of sneakers, I'm beaten the living hell out of them. Yeah. And I'm like, oh, I don't know if I can like invest in something like that. But hearing the way that you kind of got into it and stuff makes more sense to me. And then also where you guys have like the draws and everything to get the shoes, it makes me go back to my jewelry days like Chris is doing now. With watch. Very similar. Cause a lot of people come in and they say the same thing about Rolexes and stuff that we have. It's like, oh, I could never buy a watch that expensive. I beat, I beat the hell out of it. I'm gonna lose it and all that stuff. So it's a very common bond between both of the collectors. And we actually follow a guy in New Jersey who's a massive watch collector and a massive sneaker collector. So it's really cool combo that he has. And every time there's a new drop of something, he's connected to multiple like boutiques and resellers and stuff up there and he's getting the first of everything. So it's, it was interesting kind of bringing the two together and then having the opportunity to bring you guys on to

Dalton:

talk about it. Yes. Yeah, and I mean, I think that's a big thing for a lot of people cuz and y'all understand if you're into like jewelry and o xs and like watches is it's beyond just an item to some people just see it's just another pair of shoes or just another watch. But if you can really appreciate like the. The work and craftsmanship that went into the item. You understand where its value comes from and why other people want it so much. Mm-hmm. and there are truly investments cuz, I mean, there's some Rolex, you know, they were only 15,000, you know, brand new, but now they're going for like a hundred grand and you're like, you know, it doesn't make sense. But it's, it's really an avenue of investment too. Some people just buy these items to hold onto 'em for down the road, you know, now they tripled their money and so, yeah. So for each one of you

Tyler:

guys, do you, do you wear the sneakers that you get or are they like purely

Troy:

investment? So I've, I've fallen victim to both of these. I've bought shoes as investments and obviously you win some, you lose some, but I'd say right now I beat them. Yeah. Just because everything that we've kind of invested to the store, it's like, you know, we need to put that as our, our main focus right now. But you know, there's certain shoes and certain shops that kind of help, you know, they follow this business model like, You know, we're gonna buy a hundred, 200, 250 pairs of shoes and just sit on them. Wow. Seeing trends in the sneaker market, you know, there's certain silhouettes of Jordan's like Jordan one s Jordan fors, Jordan elevens, they appreciate over time just like watches mm-hmm. And to take it a step further, there's certain consignment shops that are starting to dip their toe into the watch game. Mm-hmm. you know, if, if a customer comes in and they really want a Rolex or an AP or something else, they'll go and source it for 'em. So, to sum it up, like the sneaker market is not just sneakers anymore, it's starting to expand it to collectibles that range from watches, jewelry, clothing even bear bricks that people are designing their house with skate decks that you can, you know, design a room, build benches with. Wow. It's, it's pretty interesting. That's very neat.

Tyler:

Is that something you guys plan on expanding into.

Troy:

I would love to, but we don't have the expertise right now, so I need to brush up on some of my Rolex lingo to, to try to figure out, you know, what's a fake versus a real one, but, right. That's not to say we won't do it in the future. And like the

Tyler:

skate decks and everything too, is that something you guys are interested in? Cause I didn't even know about that. That's interesting.

Dalton:

So we have some like, okay. Supreme kind of, you know, is true a New York Street brand. Yeah. And so they, they always are dropping like a new skate deck. And so like, Jack actually got the Burberry decks. Oh. And so like a skate deck. It was a collaboration with Burberry. Yeah. And I mean, retail was like 80 bucks, but like now it's like a $250 skate deck. And for some people they're like, why would you spend two $50 on skate deck? But it's Burberry, it's a designer brand. Yeah. But. Yeah, I mean, we, we have 'em in the store and we sell 'em, but they're, honestly, we kind of use 'em as aesthetic pieces. Right. And there's some collectibles that we, we use also for just aesthetics. But, you know, had a kid come in yesterday the other day, and like cactus plant, flea market did a McDonald's collaboration and I had a little plastic figuring, and a kid was like, I want it. And I was like, all right. I just gave it to him. You know? Cause to me, like it was just a, a design piece to him. It was something that he really wanted to collect and to, it meant more to him than it did me. It was just something cool to look at. So, yeah.

Jack:

That's great. As far as like the aesthetics go, I mean, part of our business model was just being unique and uncommon. And so we went, we sought out a machine shop that basically custom built a frame where we could mount skateboard decks to the frame. And to some degree it's customizable and interchangeable. But right now we have the supreme uncut deck. Just laying there as a way of people to sit down and, you know, try on shoes. Oh nice. So it's a unique piece that a lot of people haven't seen before and we just went the extra mile to use that, that product that Supreme made as a piece of art. Mm-hmm. I like that.

Chris:

Yeah. I saw some of your, your decks on social media and I was like, oh, I didn't know they were flipping those. So cuz I looked through and I, I'm always asking questions about sneakers and everything. What is, cuz all you guys I'm sure have different favorite pieces. I will have to ask, what is your favorite wearable shoe and what's your favorite collectable shoe? Cause those are two very different things.

Dalton:

had to stop. I was gonna say let Jack go. Cause I have

Jack:

one clarifying question. Yeah. Does it have to be in our collection or is it like a dream shoe? Oh, whatever. Okay. Well, I guess I'll start, I guess a dream shoe would be the red October, the Easy Red October. But within my collection it would have to be the Cactus Plant, swor Ski, Nike drawing a blank. The Nike Dunks, the Crystal Crystal Dunks. I call 'em the Twinkle Toes. Yeah,

Dalton:

They're literally a Nike dunk bejo with civa ski crystals. That's crazy. And so yeah, it's, and so we called 'em Twinkle Toes

Jack:

I even got the matching hoodie and I'm waiting for my Hot Boy summer to come out.

Dalton:

Wow. That's hilarious.

Jack:

As far as wearable shoes I would go with my Off-White, my Off-White Presto as a part of the original 10 collaboration. Yeah. So shout out. That's cool. Rest and peace. Virgil

Troy:

Yeah, I'll probably follow suit with a another off-White Virgil Shoe, which would be the Off-White Chicago one. I've had a couple pairs of those. One I have worn, and it's just such an iconic shoe because it was the first Nike collaboration shoe that Virgil did. And, you know, he's come out to probably over a hundred shoes now with the partnership. But best wearable shoe. I would probably say either the ones I'm wearing now, the Nike 87 element dunks that I wear every day because they have a cork insole and they're extremely comfortable. Or another pair that I wear quite often is the Nike Air Max pars, which has got a, a USA design on it. So it also kind of a little bit of flash and when people see it's like, oh, you know, that's really unique. I've never seen Nike do that. So and it's really hard to find now, so I That's good marketing too. It is really good marketing. It is really good marketing on, on behalf of Nike. But that also reminded me, I should probably start looking for another one because they're starting to brown a little bit.

Dalton:

So like I don't have a ton of sneakers in my collection, just cuz I sold most of them Yeah. But that was to kind of help fund my portion. But right now my, probably my favorite shoe that I have in my collection is probably the Paddle Wave Air Max ones. Okay. Yeah. Air Maxes are kind of a classic silhouette. It's a little less of a hype shoe. Mm-hmm. And so, like, not everybody gravitates to that, but it's comfortable, it's classic, it goes with everything. And that Pata collection that they did was really nice. And then for Dream Shoe, We actually have one in the store. I'm just, I don't know if I'll ever be able to bring myself into buying a pair, but Is the chunky donkey Nike Dunks. when those came out, like, I was like, man, I really want those. Yeah. And like, they're, they're far fetched, like, designed cuz it just looks like a Ben and Jerry's like right. Ice cream. But it's just such a, like a iconic shoe, especially the friends and family pack that it came in. It came in a ice cream tub. Oh no. That's crazy But yeah, that's just a, it's just a great dunk And it kind of made the dunk wave, like explode them and Travis Scott when they hit. Oh yeah.

Chris:

Yeah. I always laugh because we follow a guy on YouTube and he is, he is one who's like, I think these shoes are really nice. I'm gonna buy 'em and then I'm gonna wear them. So he has some off-white. Mm-hmm. Converses that he wears and he deadlifts in and squats in them. And the moment he did that, everyone like blew his shit up. I was like, I mean, if you got the money, why not wear 'em? They

Dalton:

wear 'em and appreciate 'em. Right. Yeah.

Chris:

Get the value out of it. I would also just put those to the side if I had that much money.

Tyler:

you guys just opened a couple weeks ago, right? Yeah. Okay. What's the what's the goal for ending out this year and going into next year? Anything that you're, you're hoping to

Dalton:

accomplish? Right now fighting with Google to try to get us on Google Maps. Oh, really? I've been fighting with them for like a month, trying to just get 'em to verify our location That's crazy. But yeah. For me, I think my, my goal personally for the, for the store would be kind of, Continuing to reach out into the community. Right. Like we've already started partnering up with some like local, with the local news station doing Okay. Like a 12 days of Christmas giveaway. Nice. And then, you know, we met, we've met some really cool people in the community that I didn't even know existed at Round here that have some really far reaches. But I think my goal is just to like, for people to know about us and see that we're gonna be community oriented. Yeah. Certainly. So

Tyler:

have you guys walked around the cargo district at all? Yeah, there's a few vintage streetwear

Dalton:

shops around. Yeah. Yeah, I have I come down here pretty often. Oh, nice. Yeah. We'll go to Alcove and yeah. And then what's the Starling? Starling? Mm-hmm. Yeah. That's a regular spot for us. Yeah.

Chris:

That's so sad. They know our names

Dalton:

Yeah. That's not a bad I mean, it isn't.

Tyler:

We also have a place in the Carter District, so Yeah.

Dalton:

True. support

Chris:

your friends. Exactly. I do. It was bad. It was my birthday the other day and like two groups of friends, like had never met each other, showed up and they were like, Hey. They were chit chatting and they were like, Hey, you know, I think Chris wants a drink. I don't know what he gets. And the bartend is like old fashioned, Chris, does it matter which one you want? Like is there a whiskey or a bourbon? And they're like, no. He just gets a different one every time. Yeah, I'm like, yeah, that's me. Cuz we drink so much whiskey. I don't wanna sit on the same thing until I've tried multiple pieces. I feel like I'd be the same way with shoes. Like I don't wanna settle on just wearing this pair if I had the funds to just buy multiples.

Dalton:

I think that. Good. I was gonna say, I think that's a problem for a lot of people. It's like, like Pokemon, you gotta collect, you gotta collect them all.

Tyler:

Exactly. And we were talking about goals too. It looked like there was something that you wanted to put in there, Jack.

Jack:

Well I'm more of the business side. I, I'm the backend bookwork. Yeah, it's a balance, but I think being community involved but also achieving profitability. Yeah, definitely.

Tyler:

is that something that looks like is possible within the first year?

Jack:

It's possible, but it's gonna take a little footwork and Dalton's our front end guy and he's the car salesman too. Ex car salesman. So I believe in him.

Tyler:

That's awesome. Usually when you start a business being profitable first year is almost unheard of. So being, having that ability out there and it's an attainable goal is amazing. Yeah. Yeah. I love that. How

Dalton:

about yourself?

Troy:

I would like to to echo what Dalton says of being a community focused, but I think another thing is also. Trying to maximize sales within the first year, just because, like you said, being profitable is very difficult. Right. So I think finishing out the year with just, you know, good sales and allowing people to come in and shop and really have that experience. And that just kind of goes back to the name Uncommon and that's why we chose it, because we looked around not just in the state of North Carolina, but just up and down the East Coast and looking at store designs and found a similar pattern of, you know, white shelves, black wall counter in the back. Right. But the approach we took thanks to, you know, Jack and his family, Dalton and his family is a more organic type of feel. You know, we have wooden shelves, you walk in, it looks clean, it feels fresh. Yeah. And then also our prices reflect that too. On the shoes. Too often do we see unrealistic markups on Yeezys and Jordans. Mm-hmm. and people get sticker shock and they're just like, Oh my gosh. You know, I can't pay five or $600 for, for this shoe when, you know, they can find it. Elsewhere about half the price. So I think combining the look and feel as well as prices and sales is just my overall goal for finishing out this year. I'm glad you mentioned

Tyler:

that too, because that was something that I didn't realize as well and was a good, a good surprise for me when I was checking out your website and everything too, and the Instagram post, I've always thought the same thing. I was like, oh, if I wanna pair of these Easys, I'm gonna have to spend like $500 for this. Mm-hmm. And I started looking at yourself, I'm like, oh, this is attainable. Like, I can actually afford these

Dalton:

shoes. Yeah. And that was kind of the goal, like Joy said being that we used to all supply other stores, we like, one of the things that we realized is like, alright, so without having, like if we're supplying our own store and not supplying others, we can kinda cut out that middle man, right? Which we can lower our cost. Still obtain the, you know, profitable goals that we want to hit mm-hmm. but provide the product to the consumers at a more attainable price point. Right. And we've really seen that resonate through people who have walked in the door. And it's, you know, you got your, your young people and then you, what we call the old heads, the guys that have been into sneakers for 20, 30 years. Even they come in and they're like, this is a good price. Wow. You know, and so we're, we're hearing that with a lot of people is that they appreciate what we're doing. They're very receptive to our pricing and everyone's really been pleased with the experience that they've had with us. I think

Tyler:

that goes a long way too with the building community that you want to do as well. So being able to come in, especially with these guys that been doing it for so many years, to really impress them with your price points and build that community that way through your trust. Yeah, I think that's huge for you guys. That's gonna be good success. I can see it.

Chris:

I love that. So when you say you guys wanna be community focused I'm, everyone means different things when they say, I've been in marketing and public relations for a little bit, so I know when people say things, they mean different things half the time. What do you guys mean by trying to be more community focused?

Jack:

I think for me it's making sure that we're involved with the youth leagues. So whether it's basketball, baseball even we had a, a semi-professional basketball coach come in the other day sponsor a team like that or the, the typical. Shoe store will do like a, a canned food drive. Mm-hmm. So making sure we, we do the normal things, but then go above and beyond and make sure that we're, we're also supporting our target demographic. So that, that's what community involvement is for me.

Troy:

Yeah. I, I would probably say the same thing. I have a little bit of a, a soft heart for the the youth leagues, cuz I used to coach a travel baseball team for about five to six years, so, oh, cool. That was one of the, I guess the biggest focus for me. But I think even, I guess taking a step further, consignment shops like this in the past have not really been as community focused. Like you sell high end shoes and apparel, it kind of just seems like this upper echelon of things and people, you know, they have different perceptions when they walk in. Going back to the price points, like we want to be fair and getting out in the community, whether that's supporting youth baseball teams, doing canned food drives, doing toys for Tots, 12 days of Christmas on, on the news station. Just interacting with people and making yourself visible I think is one of the biggest things to me. Yeah.

Dalton:

I like everything they've said like to me too, but I guess for me it's a little different too cuz I've lived here seven years and so like I've kind of, I mean in Wilmington seven years is a good bit. Like you might as well almost be a local Exactly. But also cuz a lot of times, like they said, the other stores, they'll do things but they don't really, I guess they kind of collaborate with other people or like try to make it a community beyond just what they do. Mm-hmm. And so like when y'all reached out to us, I was like, yeah, let's do it. I was like, this is awesome. I was like, because I want to be able to. Also work with people that other business owners in the community, because like small businesses, it's not the easiest thing in the, you know, right. To be successful with. And so also collaborating with other small businesses and reaching out and like, you know, and making sure that the community of just beyond, well the people that we are tar target demographic, but Wilmington as a whole realizes it's a place they can come and even just like say what's up, hang out for a little bit. Or, you know, and trust that what we're providing them is a real product and we're offering them at a fair, you know, fair price. So yeah. To beyond just like, to me, being a part of like sponsoring the community, actually being in the community. Okay. Yeah, definitely. And I know you

Tyler:

talked about

Troy:

sorry, go ahead. No, I was just gonna say, kind of just going back to what you what you mentioned, just like they say one thing, but do another It's actually just being true to our word and, you know, following through with what we're going to do. And I think we, you know, we've already started to do that just with just some of the small pieces that we're doing right now. And that's not to say, you know, we can do bigger things in the future, but, right. Yeah, it's, I, you know, I'm excited. I'm fairly new to the Wilm Wilmington community. It's only been two and a half months. So yeah, just expanding our reach and just interacting as much as possible.

Tyler:

There was, there's a, or there used to be a local company. Kind of going back to what you said too, that when they started they had quite a bit of financing behind them and chose not to go. Community route and it didn't go out, go well, so go well for them. For the most part. So I think it's really smart to kind of start local, especially in Wilmington cuz it is such a local, small community. One of my things I said since the second year I lived here is Wilmington's, the largest small town that I've ever seen in my life. It's just

Dalton:

crazy

Chris:

I think it's Wilmington itself is just a, an amalgamation of so many different parts of the East coast. Mm-hmm there's a lot of people who are tired of New York and the busyness of up there, so they're like, let's move down here cuz we don't wanna go to Florida and deal with those hurricanes. And then vice versa, all the old people who used to live in Florida moved this way cause they don't want to go back to the cold. And it just brings a lot of families here and a lot of like newcomers and being involved in the community I think will definitely grow your, your presence. And I think a lot of people. We'll, appreciate that

Tyler:

you guys are talking about your target demographic as well too. So when you're writing out the business plan, who's your ideal customer? So if you could put into like a box, one person that would walk in through your doors, that was the perfect person for you, who would it be?

Jack:

The the perfect person. I think a Wilmington has been interesting. We've seen every demographic. Mm-hmm. But for the most part, when you think of a shoe story, you think of middle age to younger. Mm-hmm. Younger people of any race, any sexuality. And it's making making an artistic decision when dressing yourself. So it's from the shoes to the clothing, you know, if it's a hat, sunglasses, it's really whatever, but. We have seen a lot of the older sneaker heads come through the door, and it's kind of surprised me, but to say there's one exact person we're targeting is hard. It's really a lot of

Dalton:

people. But yeah, and I think that's because with sneakers it's every, I guess age group has a different style. Okay. And so, like some of your older sneaker heads are into like your, your fives, your sixes, your thirteens, your twelves, and then the younger demographic is into like Nike dunks. And then you have the people who are all about Yeezy. And then, so it's a, it kind of reaches a whole spectrum of people and you know, some people that are very influenced by influencers. Yeah. You'll see. Gravitate into what is technically what they consider in style right now. Mm-hmm. And so it comes in waves. And so honestly, just targeting like what is the, I guess, the fad right now. Right. And then also like we offer beyond sneakers, like street wear. Some people don't really care about like having really nice sneakers, but they won't address, you know, either comfy, like essentials. Right. It's a designer brand through fear of God, and it's just like blanks, like nude colors, like browns, you know, blacks, grays, whites, beiges. And so that's a, you know, a whole different demographic. Some people, that's all they care about. And then you have the vintage market, which we haven't really tapped into that yet. It's kind of a thought that we want to do, but we don't really know anything about the vintage too much. Yeah. So we've, we've, we're wanting to reach out to some vintage market guys and kind of pick their brains. Oh, cool.

Chris:

So my question, because it's a collaboration of all three of you guys and because I know where I am at in the retail space, who has, like, who picks out what shoes in that you guys bring into the fold? Like is it a, oh, hey, I saw this online. I think this might be good. Are you ahead of the trends? Cause I feel like that's, that's the hard thing. Like, which one of you guys is like, oh yeah, we need to go for this swing. Or we should, I think that would be a good one. Or, that's a horrible shoe it's gonna look like for

Tyler:

people not watching. Everyone looked over Jack and they're like, here's the microphone.

Jack:

Yeah. So that's, it's, we, I'd like to think we curate a specific shoe selection. Mm-hmm. But really the way our inventory sourcing process, it's, it. What we can get our hands on. Cause the demand of these things is insane. And just this week we've, we've sold a shoe that we didn't think would sell well and we sold out and even special ordered that shoe for somebody. So it's, it's, it's really a matter of what we can get our hands on and an affordable price that we can also then share those savings on to other, you know, our customers. But then also making sure that our selection is diverse enough that we have interest and people do come back and there's always something new on the wall that they haven't seen before. So just as a little example, like the off whites, whenever there's an off-white that drops, the demand is so absurd. It's hard to. To get a full size run of that shoe. Mm-hmm. Whereas if it's your generic dunk that releases on Nike or Panda dunks that they've released about seven times we might have a full size run of that, but it's also priced accordingly so that, you know, if it is a generic shoe, it's priced at a generic price and anybody can feel comfortable paying and wearing it. Whereas an off white, off-white, you might think that's six, $700 shoe. I don't know if I wanna wear that. But we do put a little bit of attention into what we buy, particularly clothing. Cause there's a little more time to process whether that's something somebody would wear. And it goes with this shoe that recently released. Whereas with shoes, it's about speed. You have to, you have to acquire these things if it's available. There's not much thought you can put into it or you'll miss out.

Tyler:

So with sourcing, do you have to build relationships with other retailers in order to get the get the shoes that you want?

Jack:

I'm sorry, I have to steal the mic back on this one. I would say that I've, since I've been doing it for 13 years, I've kind of found unique ways to acquire inventory. Mm-hmm. and a lot of people are intimidated. But I have software programs that run on computers. I've got three computers that run 24 7 that are built and set up to automate the purchasing process. Oh, wow. So I don't have to really, hopefully, touch the mouse. That's the goal. Is the, I have two jobs right now, so making sure that I'm hands off with setup, but also that it's operating so that it does actually acquire shoes. It's a, a finicky walk where you have to, you know, People don't like talking about bots, but also it's, it's the way of getting your hands on these things. Mm-hmm. if you do try and manual a shoe, it's just about impossible. Wow. And if you do have software programs that do it for you, it does make it easier. Discussing fairness is a whole nother story, but we, we, we do it I think for a good reason. It's not like we're out here charging way over market for a shoe. We're trying to make sure it gets into the true collector's hands at affordable price. And over the years these software programs have taken numerous iterations and more advanced. And with more advanced, you have to pay more. So, I mean, it's something that we've kind of paid our dues in to make sure that we're using good programs and it's still an

Tyler:

investment on that side too. Oh yeah. So, yeah, I think people think like, I know some people, cuz I, I get in the bot game too just because the world that I'm in, I have to know about it. But I think people think when they think bots, it's like, oh, someone just put this like software in their computer and they're just buying up all of these like shoes or watches or whatever the case may be. And I was like, no, there's a lot of work that goes into those things and a lot of engineering behind it.

Jack:

It's, yeah, it's not just even the coding, but setting up the program to start at this certain time with this certain keyword. And I mean, I've messed up keywords before and I accidentally got shoes. I didn't want Oh no, I got 30 pair of a shoe I didn't want. And it's, I didn't even think about that. You have to go with the punches. So you sometimes you take an L and you just have to roll with the punches, sell it and move on. Yeah. And it's not easy and it takes time and experience to, to figure out what keywords you need to use. And just the other day when the Jordan won taxis release, I had a very generic keyword in and I checked out some J Balvin slides, so it happened.

Dalton:

So

Tyler:

for Jack and Troy, when you guys found out that it were, that you guys were coming down to Wilmington, how big of a cell was that to get you guys to come down here?

Troy:

It was actually a lot because I was really hesitant on first just because of how saturated the market is in North Carolina. Yeah, I really wanted to go further south to start in a city that was a little bit bigger just to kind of get that reach. Mm-hmm. but then we kind of just started looking at everything, living ex living expenses and overhead cost. And Wilmington just made the most sense. And, you know, we're obviously extremely gracious for Dalton and his wife opening up their house to us. But like I said earlier, it really happened. Extremely quickly because, you know, we were looking at a space on, on Princess Street and it didn't really fit what exactly we were looking for. And then the space beside Augusts opened up on, on News Center and we just all collectively looked at it and said, you know, if we never take this leap, we're never ever going to do it. Yeah. And so, you know, we thought we were probably going to have to start looking again at the start of the year. And I'd say that changed pretty rapidly in two weeks. We ended up talking to our landlord, signed the lease, and I think within the next couple days I just packed up two suitcases and moved into Dalton's house. Oh, wow. There's still every now and then where I, I'll have to go back and and drive three hours to go get some more things right. Just to make my life a little bit easier. But it's one of those sacrifices that you have to make. So I've enjoyed it so far. It's, it's part of the fun, you know? Yeah. Just. Taking a chance on it and, you know, just seeing what turns out.

Dalton:

That's really

Tyler:

cool. Mm-hmm. how about you, Jack? How big of a sale was it? Get you down

Dalton:

here? It

Jack:

was a pretty big sale. I was like I was like, Troy, where I really wanted to be in a different market. I knew North Carolina was too saturated and Charleston or Mount Pleasant would've been the dream spot, but the cost of living down there was just absurd and the way the market prices were mm-hmm. the rent cost and all that, it just didn't make sense. And I think after we had realized it was that expensive, well we'll just put this on the back burner till next year. Let's see what recession we might have and mm-hmm. and get through that and start while the economy's weak instead of going through the weakness. Wilmington kind of contradicted the, the. Thought of going to Charleston and the numbers were starting to make sense as I was kind of modeling out the finances and the low cost of living just because of how gracious Dalton and Macy were, opened their house up to us for a couple months to get this going. And at some point Troy and I might move out, but I think we're enjoying it. they're moving out

Tyler:

bone's. Like I may not be married if you don't move out, so,

Jack:

but it, it was a lot easier once I saw the numbers. I'm a numbers guy. I'm accountant by day. I'm kind of shoes by night. So I was working through taxi season. I didn't really wanna think about opening a store and I got through the four 15 deadline and over the summer I think Dalton's. I don't give a shit attitude. Let's just do it. Mm-hmm. Attitude rubbed off on me and I was like, you know what, let's just full send it. Yeah, yeah. And I said, I need to get through the nine 15 deadline, which is the extension time for the, the tax returns I work on, and we'll see what holds. And I think in early September we were starting discussing a lease and it wasn't too bad having discussions, but then signing late September, early October, I mean, we hit the ground running. Yeah. And Wilmington, it was like we were committed at that point. Yeah. We'd talked to numerous landlords, numerous agents for leases and we did this all ourself. Like we, we worked through it and just hit the ground running and did all the renovating ourself and got open within a month and a half, which. I'm pretty proud of. So

Dalton:

that was while all working, like full-time jobs. Oh wow. Yeah. And then I guess like going back to like what, like the sell on Wilmington, but for me, like living here, like the hardest sell for me was leaving my job. Cause like we were all like, who's gonna quit their job and run the store full time? And like yeah, I was, I've been at Toyota for four years and I'm like, alright. And like in car sales, that's a very long time. Yeah. Like I was like the fifth longest tenured salesperson there. And then I was like, you know what, this is what I want to do. This is my dream. I was like, y'all have like jobs where it's like steady. I was like, I'll quit. I'll run the, the store they can help out in the back. And then my wife was like, you know what? If you're gonna do it, do it. Like Right. And so having her support was kind of selling her on, it was a, is a sell and its own, but she was very supportive. And then Like Jack said, we, we knocked out the store in six weeks and we were like, our goal was to open up before, you know, holidays shopping. And we did it. It took a lot of efforts from family and friends, but we made it happen. Yeah. Your

Tyler:

build out went really quick, cuz I saw like the day that you got the keys on Instagram. Mm-hmm. and then I was like, dang, they're making some progress. And then open even before Black Friday, I was like, well shoot

Dalton:

Yeah. I need to, I have some like transformation photos that I was gonna do, like a video reel for Oh yeah. And just kind of show like how it progressed. But we put a lot of time and effort into it.

Troy:

We were burning the midnight oil before grand opening. Oh, I believe that. Yeah. It was it was very interesting. It was fun. We didn't really get a whole lot of sleep, but our wrapping machine broke on the. On the on the shoe wrap, so it overheated and we actually had to go get a new fuse. So we were wrapping shoes with a flat iron. Oh, no, And so like over the past two weeks we've had to take shoes down, redo them, relabel, reprocess. Just so you know, we want the appearance to look good. When people turn over a shoe, they look at the barcode, they scan it, and there's not just this massive line from a flat iron ceiling it together, But yeah, it's been a lot of fun and I think that just goes back to like the organic feel and the atmosphere that we're trying to provide.

Chris:

Yeah. That's neat. So I guess in my head I just like you and you mentioned you were fighting Google and Tyler was like, oh yeah, they're across from Target. And I'm like, where? Across from Target? Yeah. But you guess that you're next

Dalton:

to August's. Augustino. So there's so you have the strip right there, like when you're going into Target on new center mm-hmm. Right before you turn into the target entrance on the left, there's August's, Catawba Brewery like there's a Japanese restaurant, Mizuki. Oh yeah. It's in that strip right there. And then behind it, it's like Ozzie Island Surf Shop. Yeah, that's right. Yep.

Chris:

It had to be awesome. In my head I thought you were the stripped

Dalton:

up, like

Chris:

from Target. Yes. I thought you were next to like Plato's. That's what my brain was thinking.

Dalton:

Yeah. No, so it's the one after Plato's, like when you're coming, going towards Target. Okay. Coming

Chris:

from Hooters. Yes. That's what you need to eat. It's some wings, some beer, and you go buy some shoes.

Dalton:

Exactly. Yeah. Make sure

Tyler:

you get that liquor in. You Buy two pair. There you go. What was one of the biggest obstacles that you guys faced when opening the retail location? That

Troy:

you might as well go first.

Jack:

I'd say it goes back into finding the right location. So the finances is where my head goes first. Yeah. And then secondly, I would say making sure that we had enough product to put out that was diverse enough that we felt like we could open a store that was gonna draw some attention. And the, the, you can ask them the finances, what really sent me up a wall. I was running different iterations. I was running a high, low, best case, worst case, you name it. But I know I can acquire inventory, that's not the problem. It's making sure that all the numbers make sense on the back end and. I think also I have a very demanding job. So I'm working 65 hours billable during like our busy season. Oh wow. And balancing that and making sure the store is getting the attention it needs. And I know both Troy and Dalton had demanding jobs, making sure we put the due diligence in and we weren't jumping the gun on any opportunity and making sure the market wasn't about to tank on us. And we were getting in over our heads. Cause there were some landlords that wanted north of half a million in financial guarantees. And that's just not practical for 25, 26 year olds wanting to start a business. So those were pretty much shut down immediately. And that's also what also made Wilmington make sense. Mm-hmm. I'll let

Troy:

Troy, I think the biggest concern for me was location. I think consignment shops like this traditionally like to. Place themselves in malls just because of the natural foot traffic. So that was one of my biggest concerns is like, okay, if we go outside of Independence Mall, if we go outside of Princess Street, you know, the downtown area mm-hmm. how much traffic are we really going to get? Because shoes relies on that. Just, you know, stopping in, just looking around and being like, oh, you know, I can remember this next time I go into a shopping district, a mall, and things like that. So and you know, we started to finally get over that hump with people coming into August's and they're, you know, you should see some of the looks that we get and they just stop, like dead in their tracks and you're just like, just looking all around, you know? I didn't know a shoe shop was here. This used to be, you know a different type of boutique. And I think the second thing. Outside of location was just the timing of it, timing of it all because, you know like Jack had mentioned earlier, there's been talks of recession, whether we're currently in one or there's one coming. Mm-hmm. you know, I'll let other people decide for that. But the sneaker market really is in an interesting place because a lot of people started reselling shoes with c and once that money started to run out I think we're starting to see a pretty significant shift in shoes and the overall demand for them too. The demand still is extremely high, but prices are falling all across the board. So those are probably my two biggest concerns, but, I think Dalton's attitude again is just, you know, I don't give a shit. Let's just go ahead and do it right. That's pretty much been the motto since day one, and that's kind of just what I tell myself every day is like, you know, you can't really be worried about that stuff too much, even though it's always gonna be in the back of your mind.

Tyler:

I really appreciate the go forward attitude because one of the things that I get stuck behind a lot, cause I'm very similar to you, I'm all about, I'm numbers based. I'm a financial advisor by day, so I, I completely understand. And so you, a lot of people start to get that paralysis by analysis. So without that person to be like, Hey, we've done this enough, let's just fucking do it. Like, you need that behind you. So I appreciate

Dalton:

that. Ironically, I would actually say like, being in sales, like knowing like the car market. Yeah. Like I've been in the, like I said, I was in car business for four years, right? Yeah. I started as soon as I graduated college in 2018. And I kind of saw the, like as soon as Covid happened mm-hmm. like every market exploded, like they said, sneakers, sports cards, any collectible cars, like, you know, everything kind of flipped on its head. Things that shouldn't be appreciating are now being, are appreciating. And I think we kind of like, we under, we know we kind of missed that, like boom. Yeah. But one thing that happened I think within the sneaker market was it brought attention to it like, more people are now into shoes in street wear than ever before. Mm-hmm. I think that, I read an article, you know, the sneaker market, I think they said by 2030, supposed to be like a $10 billion Oh wow. Market like a industry. Yeah. And you think shoes have been around for forever, you know? Yeah. And so it's, it's a continuously growing market. But I think my, honestly my wife was the one that really was like pushing me cuz I was like, man, I was like, Because it, it originally started, it was like, let's just do it. Let's go do it. And then like, then like the whole scare of like, if there's a recession mm-hmm. and them two being more like analytical guys are like, well, maybe we need to wait. And then I, and you know, me and my wife would talk, I like, man, I really want to just do this. I was like, I wanna leave my job. I was like, I know that sounds crazy cuz I really enjoyed my job. Mm-hmm. like, I enjoyed the people I like worked with, but after four years it was like, I'm kind of just getting stagnant here and, you know, and I wanted, I've always wanted to own my own business and, and then my wife was like, you know what? I think y'all just need to do it. Like, if y'all don't do it, you're always gonna find a reason not to do it. Mm-hmm. And so she was pushing me, which egged me to push them and then I was like, guys, let's just do it. I was like, this is what we need to do. I was like, I was like, it's, it's a short term like lease in the grand scheme of things cuz you know, on top of like a lot of places asking for a lot of money. But like they were wanting us to. Five, six year leases and we're like, oh yeah, we're starting out. Like we don't know how fast we're gonna grow if we, you know, if we sign this and we're outgrowing it, then we wanna be able to like progress to the growth. But yeah, I mean I think honestly the, like my wife motivated me more to motivate them and so it was kind of nice to really have that support. And I think that's something that's different that a lot of people don't see is cuz like she, she really wanted me to do it cuz she knew I wanted to do it. That's

Tyler:

really neat. Yeah. It's good to have that support behind you too. Yeah, because I, I know a lot of people that their wise have been like, you wanna leave a stable job to do what? Yeah. So that's awesome. Yeah. Mm-hmm. And we are starting to come up our time, so we do have one last question for each one of you. If you were to tell your younger self one thing, what would it be? It's going around to you sooner later.

Troy:

Go ahead Troy. One thing I'd tell my younger self That's a really good question. I would probably just tell myself to just like, just go for it. I think too many times I, I've doubted myself and abilities mm-hmm. Yeah. And I think most recently, over the last two years, I've kind of started to shake that habit. So, you know, as a teenager and probably as a young kid, just, you know, pretty much don't care what other people think. Mm-hmm. I know that's a very cliche answer, but I've started to actually see that unfold as owning a business. Yeah. Because you're going to have people walk in, they're gonna try to, you know, tell you why did you do this? Why are your hours like this? Why did you display it this way? And you just gotta, you know, remain headstrong and just do it your way. Mm-hmm. And just, and just go for it. Just because you only have so many chances in life and I feel like this is a, a very big one for all of us. Yeah. So yeah, that's probably what I would tell my younger self. That's awesome. I

Dalton:

like it.

Jack:

I'm gonna keep it short and sweet. And I think Dalton and Troy would agree with this one, but I would tell myself to live a little, I've I've been a workaholic my whole life and I think getting here to this point kind of shows it. And I think if I could go back and do it again, live a little bit more, enjoy the, the fun things in life and don't take everything so serious. So I can still work on that now. It's never too late, but that's what I'd tell my younger self

Tyler:

I I'm with you completely. I was the same way too. There was so many opportunities I gave up because I was like, oh, nope. Need to get more hours in here. I need to get more hours in there. I gotta gotta make those more green backs,

Dalton:

So I guess lastly for me, like growing up, I think we always, as kids, you always have a dream. It's like, oh, like, like I played sports. Oh, I wanna be a baseball player. Mm-hmm. oh, I wanna be an astronaut. And then I think as you get older you kind of get that mentality of. I just need to find a job that will pay the bills and I can, you know, do what I need to do and feel stable. But I think this opportunity's really showed me that, like, find what you want to do. Like find your why, like what motivates you and just hit it headstrong. Just do what you want to do and follow your dreams because the only person you're gonna really hold you back is yourself. Yeah, that's

Tyler:

completely true. Nice. Have you read the books by Simon Sinek? Mm-hmm. So it is, it's it's either your why or find your why, something like that. But it's, it's very similar

Dalton:

to what you said. Yeah. Yeah. It's very good. So,

Chris:

because we're at the end, do you want to tell us what you're giving away?

Jack:

Okay, sure. So we are giving away a hundred dollars gift card store credit to our store. And I think it's another just way of getting involved and showing our appreciation to y'all for having us on and. Your listeners. And we hope that anybody that's listening comes into the store enjoys, enjoys the environment. And even if you aren't winning we hope that you find a good deal in the store and walk out a happy customer. They

Tyler:

asked if they could bring us anything, and I asked for Yeezys and Jordans, but they said no on that, but they give us a hundred dollars giveaway, so I was like, all right, I'll

Troy:

take

Jack:

that episode two. Right. Love

Dalton:

it. And so I guess like to collaborate with it I want, we will organize something for like Instagram for followers to, to go and like, and share together, and then we'll do we'll do a raffle, we'll, we'll coordinate that together. Perfect. And make that happen. And it can be someone in Wilmington or it can be outside, you know, any Awesome. Okay. So we'll be able to, we'll either mail the gift card or we can give them the code that they can use online because we ship, you know, nationwide.

Chris:

Oh, that's great. Awesome.

Troy:

Get your Christmas Christmas shopping done early.

Tyler:

Exactly. If I won that, it'd be Christmas shopping for myself. thank you all so much for coming on and what are some of your plugs that you wanna give yourself that they can follow you on Instagram or anything like that?

Dalton:

So our stores Instagram is at Uncommon Boutique nc. If you wanna follow me, the store only follows three people with us. Three. Okay. Yeah. That's awesome. We did that just to keep it kind of clean, so Yeah. Smart.

Chris:

I love it. So we'll plug that in the show notes. Yeah. And because this is a community episode, we're given away. On top of the a hundred dollars gift card someone else will also win a goodie pack from the Walton's Distillery. Mm-hmm. So you're gonna get a bottle of the, the Ian Walton's, like their straight bourbon whiskey plus their swag bag, which has like some key chains stickers, magnets and some just cool information about the company. Like you said, they're just a really interesting place to visit and check out. I know Southeast North Carolina doesn't really have any whiskey distilleries similar to, we don't have a ton of shoe boutiques. So we thought this was a great way to get you guys some holiday gifts and presents. Leading into Christmas, definitely go up

Tyler:

to Waltons too and do their distillery tour. It's actually free for anyone that goes up there. They do 'em about every half hour or so. Mm-hmm. very informative. You learn a lot about whiskeys and moonshine and how it all started in North Carolina here. And also their whiskey's just really good too, cuz North Carolina's not really known for their whiskey and it's, it's starting to step up their game and they've been around for quite a while. So they're eventually gonna start getting into those older aged whiskeys as well too. So their bourbon will probably be around six years coming up soon. They have some barrels that are aging in there, so that some of those are the ones I'm looking forward to as well. But this one's a good

Chris:

one. Yeah. So yeah. Thank you guys for listening. You know, just follow us on social media. Leave a nice review or like on Spotify, apple Podcast, is that what

Dalton:

it's called?

Tyler:

Yeah, apple Podcast, Stitcher. Spotify, all of them. Were pretty much everywhere. Come find

Chris:

us. See. But yeah. Cheers fellows. Cheers. Thank

Dalton:

you, cheer. Thank you.