Whiskey & Wisdom

How to Conquer Burnout, with Angela Kayley Thorne

November 23, 2022 Angela Kayley Thorne Episode 42
Whiskey & Wisdom
How to Conquer Burnout, with Angela Kayley Thorne
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Show Notes Transcript

Angela Kayley Thorne joins us on the podcast this week! She is a local business owner and business coach that can teach you how to avoid burnout. In this episode we discuss how to conquer burnout, finding your purpose, and what she has learned from traveling all over the world. 

If you're listening November 23rd make sure you tell Chris happy birthday!

This week we're sippin' on Starward's Nova Single Malt Whisky
*Thank you, Uncle Ben from Australia!

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Thank you all for listening to this week's podcast! If you enjoy listening please consider rating, following, and reviewing the show.

How to find us:
Whiskey & Wisdom: @whiskey.and.wisdom
Chris Kellum: @ctkellum
LinkedIn: Christopher Kellum
Tyler Yaw: @tyler_yaw_
LinkedIn: Tyler Yaw

Tyler:

Welcome back everybody to the Whiskey and Wisdom

Chris:

Podcast. It was pretty fun. But this week you have myself, AK Chris, the number one co-host, sorry, Palmer and Tyler, the ever present host. And we bring on an amazing young lady named Angela who is, I guess a social media genius. And I mean, that's what I'm gonna call you.

Angela:

It might be a little bit of an overstatement, but I do like it. We'll, we'll go with it.

Chris:

And also a clean in our own right with Rodan and Fields. Mm-hmm. But we'll get into that a little bit later. Yeah.

Tyler:

We were actually lucky enough this week. One of my wife's uncles lives in Australia and brought us back a bottle that is a award-winning. It is called Star War. Star War. Mm-hmm. And it is the Nova blend here. And it looks like it is a single mo Australian whiskey matured in red wine barrels.

Chris:

You want some details on that? I would love that. Yeah. So starward as in like look towards the stars instead of star word cuz that's what my head originally thought of. But yes, like you said, single malt whiskey still don't know what a single malt whiskey is. If anybody knows, we'll search it and I don't

Tyler:

put it

Chris:

on Instagram for you. But they're pretty cool based out of Australia. They actually double distill their whiskey and they use malted bar. From Australia. And they actually barrel it with really low alcohol content so they can get some flavor from the wine barrels that they matured in. It's kind of nice. It's supposed to, you know, smell the fla, the fruit and berries you're supposed to taste. Red berry pudding with little vanilla, caramel and spice. Not

Angela:

quite sure what red berry. I was gonna say

Tyler:

putting, I'm not sure what that tastes

Chris:

like. It's kinda, I'm assuming similar to like figgy pudding, but they just use red berries instead of figs. Still haven't had that yet. I'm quite

Angela:

sure how Figgy pudding out there. there's a song

Chris:

about it too, really.

Angela:

It's ringing a bell, but we're

Chris:

coming to Christmas season.

Tyler:

The only pudding that I've had that's in a song is banana pudding.

Chris:

go with it. But yeah, trying something different. Because Tyler's uncle brought it from us or sent it from Australia. I don't know how I got it. He brought it on a plane. We don't talk about this. No, you're allowed to. You're allowed to. Did he? I mean, I

Angela:

brought plenty back from Ireland. right. There was actually one thing that I learned while I was there. That's like my only whiskey knowledge. And I don't even know if it applies to all whiskeys or just Jameson, but depending on how many years it, or like how old the whiskey is, that's how many seconds you wanna hold it in your mouth to get the full flavor before you swallow it. Interesting. Yeah, I had not heard that before. It made a huge difference in the taste. Like you don't get the burn and it's like really bad It's like really strong. That makes sense.

Chris:

Yeah. Sorry. So many jokes. I

Tyler:

saw it. I know, I saw it coming.

Chris:

Let's try something new. Cheers. Cheers.

Tyler:

It is really, I like that a lot. It almost, it doesn't taste like a traditional whiskey. I think it's because it's aged in those red wine barrels. Yeah, it's fruity.

Angela:

Yeah.

Chris:

Or it's single malt. Or because it's under 50% alcohol,

Tyler:

that could be it too. We haven't had something under 50% a long time.

Chris:

it's only 41. But this whiskey has traveled the world very similar to you, miss Angela. This is true. I heard you have a nice, interesting background. Yeah.

Tell

Tyler:

us a little bit about yourself. Start as early as you want in South Africa.

Angela:

Yeah. Yeah. That would actually be great. So born in South Africa. Dad's from there. Mom's from England. She. Actually a really cool story. Her family moved to South Africa by, I don't know when they ended up on in a Volkswagen van driving all the way through Africa, like staying in the most insane little like villages where they didn't speak any of the languages or anything like that. So she has a really cool story of how she got there. I don't know all the details, but my grandpa pretty much made it happen and that's where she met my dad. And they have a super cute little love story. But anyway, down the line they had us, we moved from South Africa up to England where my dad was, where we had some family while my dad was working in Holland. So he was traveling throughout the week. And then we were only there for about a year before we moved to Holland and all stayed there as a family for another year and a half or so. Went back to South Africa for a little bit, ended up moving to California cuz he was working for Cisco Systems. Oh yeah. And then Cisco Systems moved him to North Carolina. I went to high school in Raleigh, came to U C W for college, went back to work for a little bit in Raleigh and came back here. Nice. Wilmington's. Very, very hard to leave. Yeah. I understand that. Yeah. That's a little bit about my got here. Travel.

Tyler:

That's really cool. Yeah, you're you're very well traveled outside of that as well too, just from seeing on social media and everything. So that's why we wanted to bring the Australia whiskey on for you

Angela:

to one place. I haven't been actually, I really, really wanna go. I'm definitely like a tropics travel type person. No. Is that cuz the bugs? Why are you shaking your head Yes, massive. They are scaring me a little bit's held me back from

Chris:

going. That's, I would say if you could take off like a month, like three weeks or something, I would say do it just because traveling there is such a long flight, but once you're over in Australia you can hit like, you can go up the island chain and hit a bunch of other places. Yeah. And, and then flying back is like stupid long too. Yeah.

Angela:

Very curious about like Indonesia and that kind of area as well.

Tyler:

That'd be a lot of fun.

Chris:

Yeah. So be a long trip. it would be but you work from home.

Tyler:

and for yourself. So you'd be the one to do it. And that's another reason why I brought you on. Mm-hmm.

Angela:

Yeah. Tell us about that. That's, that's kind of why I started working for myself when I graduated college. I really had like the most unrealistic expectations for adulting I was like, I'm gonna be a millionaire by 26. Like mm-hmm. that vibe. And, you know, you face real life and realize that's a lot harder than, or a lot easier said than done. Right. And so anyway, when I graduated I just really wanted to stay in Wilmington. It was really hard to find jobs here at the time. And so I started working, selling furniture actually in sales, which not what I thought I would be in, but you guys probably have somewhat similar stories. And I ended up actually really loving it, but I was working for somebody else, holidays, weekends, late night sometimes, and it. Wasn't what I had envisioned at all for my life. So when I saw a girlfriend of mine, she had posted on Facebook about how she was doing this whole Viridian Fields thing. I didn't know much about the company at all. Shortly after I found out I'd actually stolen some of the products from my mom in the past, it was like the best thing I'd ever put on my skin. So I was like, oh wait, these things like actually work. That's funny. And I really was not a hard sell. Like I was looking for something to change and I was really open to it. So I was like, you know, why not this brand has the credibility? I know the products work, the results, like from the photos I had seen looked amazing. So I was like, let me just try something new. And I'll never forget, it was like the third day that I was. Oh my gosh, this is gonna be so much fun. Like I'm learning so much, so fast, like I can see the potential here. And so I just started running with it and that was like six years ago. Oh, wow. And I was still working at the time. I still worked for those first few years, but it was about three years ago where I quit my job, started doing it full-time and it's been some changes since then. Some actual recent changes career-wise as well. But I know we can get into that or not if you guys want to. Yeah, yeah, sure. So 20, I quit my job in 2020, like literally March of 2020 Oh wow. I had just, I had gotten fed up with what I was doing at the time. I was no longer in furniture sales. I was actually working for a guy who has a IT and digital forensics company, so totally different industry. I was more so doing like admin stuff. And thankfully that turned into a remote job that I was able to bring back to Wilmington that was in Raleigh. And I was still doing rodeo fields the whole time. Things are going great as business does, you know, like up and down, but it was still progressing and I was, things started going really well around that time and I got fed up with my job, so I was like, let me quit and just run with this and kind of go for some of the other things that I wanted to do, like business coaching and all that. So I started business coaching then, and I ran a program called Burnout to Breakthrough. Mm-hmm. for two years. That was incredibly fulfilling. Like I really, really enjoyed it, helped a lot of people, but I ended up setting my goals a little too big and burning myself out in the process of teaching other people how to not burn out. And when I came down to it, I just realized running two businesses at the same time that although they were very intertwined it. It was, I don't think I had the skill set to manage like financially really understand like how to go month to month when your incomes are so different month to month. And just certain things that I was like, you know, I need to take a step back. I need to set one of my businesses up to kind of run itself if I wanna run with the other one. And that was in May of this year. So this summer I pretty much spent setting up all of these systems in my Rodian Fields business to take a lot of the time off of my hands that I was investing. And it was set up really great. And I was like, all right, fall, I'm gonna get back into business coaching. I love doing it. And I was super randomly offered a part-time position working for a company called Abbott Vascular. Mm-hmm. they're in California. My mom works for them. Okay. They needed somebody else on their team to help with admin stuff, and I just, I stay open. Opportunity. Yeah. And. So I jumped into that and I'm actually doing that really 20 hours a week part-time from home. It's super flexible, but it allowed me to be able to invest more time in my Rodian Fields business and still be making the same income that I was making when I was running the program. Oh, wow. Yeah. So ideally I can get, right now we're in a really busy season with Radiant Fields. We just launched a new product in hair care, which we've only ever done skin care in the past. Okay. So it's a huge season of growth for us, but I am just really grateful to kind of be able to focus on one area for my, myself, and my future, and then still have this like, Foundational support and financially at

Tyler:

least. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Yeah. When you first left your job in the IT field in 2020, did you notice when you had that extra focus on Rodin fields that it kind of took off?

Angela:

No. so I actually, I'm quite the opposite happened. I think, you know, the law of physics that's like, what, what's this? I don't even know what it is. Interesting emotion. Thank you. I don't know why I can never remember that. But I think working for somebody else helped me manage my time better cause I had somebody to report to. Yeah. And then once everything was on me, it was like, I'm a free bird, you know, I can do whatever I want when I want. And it really, when nobody's holding you accountable and I really didn't have mentors that close to me at the time that would hold me accountable. It. I kind of fizzled a little bit. Okay. It was really busy for a couple months and then I was just kind of like, oh, it's going so well. I can chill. Oh. And I could, but I chilled a little too much. And I've learned that lesson a few times in business Yeah.

Tyler:

There's a a coach that I, I use now actually his name's Ben Newman. Fantastic coach. If you ever hear him speak or anything like that, definitely worthwhile. But one of his big things and what I really need in my life is very similar to what you said, so I'm so glad you brought it up. Mm-hmm. is, don't let Success stop you, is one of those major things that he has. And what we just went through last month is our goal setting starts in October. And the reason why you set your 2023 goals in. Is because once you set those goals, you start putting the disciplines and the standards in place. So you finish 2022 the way you wanna start 2023. And exactly what you said is an issue that I've always had too, is like, okay, I have the success. I can take my foot off the gas. And then if your foot's not on the gas anymore, you start coming to a standstill. Exactly. So I'm so glad you brought that up and being honest about that. Yeah,

Chris:

absolutely. So I am king of multiple rabbit trails. Mm-hmm. through everything. First off, can you tell me how much you make? I'm just kidding. I wouldn't do that to you, I don't

Angela:

even know if I know for being honest. Honest, I have and flows. I'm not, it's finances is really not my forte. could probably use some coaching in that. Sure.

Chris:

If you need somebody to help you with investing, I know a guy. Oh, good to know. Yes, me too. So. Random thoughts. Business coaching. I feel like that to me is as broad of a term as sales. Like cuz Pop who will be on here eventually is technically a business coach. Mm-hmm. But he works with bigger businesses or like mom and pop own shops I guess. Mm-hmm. I think that's, he's always doing something and I can never keep up cuz I'm like, what, what? So ridiculous. So when you say business coach or what you were doing and what you're potentially going to do again in the future mm-hmm. What was your focus?

Angela:

So I honestly would prefer to call it like confidence coaching. When I look back now and I really see what people got out of it the most, it was the massive transformation that people were experiencing was in their confidence and how they portrayed that online. So specifically for network people in network marketing. So, When I launched the program, I was really like anybody who's doing social selling, really using like social media to sell whatever their product or their service is. That's who I wanted to take on. But because I'd been in network marketing for so long, those were the people I had reaching out to me. And then were actually a lot of people in like real estate and people who wanted to focus on the social media side of things. But when I got into the conversations with them about it, I really niche down into network marketing. I was like, this is where I have experience. These are the people that I can help the most. So it was mostly kind of mindset work and then how to translate that into what you're sharing on social media and how to engage people in that way. Cool.

Chris:

So going back to network marketing and what you're focusing on now, which is Rodan Fields. Mm-hmm. For Ding Dongs like me,

Angela:

what is that? What is network marketing or what is Rodan Fields?

Chris:

Rodan Fields. I know what

Angela:

network marketing. Okay, cool. Well, so Rodan Fields is a skincare brand started by Dr. Rodan and Dr. Fields. They're actually the doctors who originally created Proactive, you know, Justin Timberlake commercials and all that. They they were really successful, obviously with Proactive. They ended up selling that brand off to create their legacy brand, which was Rodan Fields. So it wasn't just for teenage acne, it was more for the main skincare concerns that they saw in their dermatology offices. And they actually still run dermatology offices now. Oh,

Chris:

interesting. I know that.

Angela:

Yeah. And the number one skincare brand in North America for less like. Don't quote me on this, but I wanna say seven years running. Oh,

Chris:

wow. Yeah. Since she started

Angela:

selling. Right.

Tyler:

Direct correlations. Exactly. So when people say network marketing, there's quite a few people that have reservations with that. Mm-hmm. Did you have those reservations when you first started?

Angela:

Yes and no. Mm-hmm. I definitely had like the typical reservations, like the, the like pyramid scheme, the sales reservation for sure. Because working in a furniture store at the time, people are literally walking in the door to you to look for things where network marketing is just like who do I sell to? Kind of thoughts. Yeah. And, but for me it was. So simple. Once I started looking at the business model and how it compared to what I had studied in school. Mm-hmm. I went to school for entrepreneurship and business development. Oh, okay. You are pretty much studying what business opportunity looks like and how to better organizations. And so for me it was kind of easy to get over those like hurdles that a lot of other people have or kind of get through a lot of the misconceptions. And when it came down to it, it was a product that I knew worked, that I knew helped people and I was willing to share that. So I'd say I had them, but I got over them very quickly.

Chris:

send it. Oh, okay. The Chris

Tyler:

was gonna say something. Now I forgot. Got

Chris:

em. Okay. So thanks Sorry we're, we haven't been together in a while, so I gotta the, we gotta a little, okay. So. because you're on here, might as well plug yourself a little bit. What is your favorite product from rf?

Angela:

Ooh, that's a hard one, but it's the pro, I'd have to say it's the product that sold me. It's a face wash. It's actually what we sell our core regimen. So essentially it's a multi-med therapy. Mm-hmm. which basically means it's the right ingredients used in the right formulations applied to your skin in the right order to get the, the best results possible. And so when I, like I said earlier, when I first started and I was like, what is this brand reading fields? And I checked my drawer and I found something in there that was like, probably super expired, but worked anyway. Right. It was this face wash from the redefined line. Okay. Yeah. Interesting. I mean like kalin clay, it's very good for the pores. especially if you live at the beach. You said

Chris:

kale and clay?

Angela:

K Olin. K a o l i n. Wow. Okay.

Chris:

See we both have the same So you're mixing kale and putting on your skin. Yeah.

Tyler:

Did you give when you talked to two guys about this

Angela:

Well, I'm happy to educate,

Chris:

right? You have really good skin, so thank you. I would hope so. I appreciate that. I bunch of like dry spot. Emily was like, Hey, you should wash your face. You have a dry spot. And I'm like, sure. Wash my face. And then it was more dry. Yeah. I'm like, let's put moisturizer. Nope. Still flaky. So I should probably, I know someone to talk to.

Angela:

I should have brought you guys some samples.

Chris:

I mean, I know a girl, an esthetician who will be on here one day. That'd be interesting.

Tyler:

I remember my question now. Oh good.

Chris:

I'm just here to like BS until he remembers this stuff. Sweet. Yeah.

Tyler:

That's how this works. So when you first started, you said the sales thing was kind of a, a hurdle for you. So how did you get started into marketing yourself with this new company that you were working

Angela:

with? So I'm really thankful. The person that I joined, she's no longer in the business, but she was using social media. And I think often a lot of people look at businesses like this as like the old Tupperware brands, like your mom's like long lost cousin used to sell to you at house parties. But she was posting on Instagram stories and at prior to signing up to do this, I really wanted to work online for myself. I could travel like that was, and all I really saw online. Blogs, right. And like people who all said it took them 10 years before they were able to do something, I was like, I don't have that much time. I wanna travel now So I kind of just honestly started throwing stuff up on social media. When I look back at it, I'm like, what in the world? Like, what is this stuff you can't even read half of like the stuff that I like hand wrote on stories and whatever. But I just started getting it out to my network and then I really contacted like people who I knew would support me, like my family. I contacted my best friends, but you know, they're like, oh, she's never gonna last. Like, cause she's not gonna do this for long. So a lot of those people only came around years later, but just kind of collected some reviews, testimonials at the beginning, and then remarketed those back through and done that for six years now and Oh wow. Kept it going

Tyler:

So were you naturally comfortable on social media or did that take a while to like, Actually talk on it and show your face o

Angela:

talking on it was really hard. Yeah. But at the time I really, at the very beginning, I was using like static posts that other, like photos other people had taken. That was something I was really grateful for. Community wise. Everybody was so collaborative. Everybody was more than willing to like share their content for you to share. And so it got me started and I started showing my face more when the girl that I was working with challenged me to go on a team page that had like under 200 people on it. It's just a Facebook group and tell my story and give some tips on like what had been working for me so far. Okay. The team was really new at the beginning and or when I started. And that was like, oh, it's not that scary. Right? Like, I know it's like a smaller group. It's not really people I know. Like it wasn't as bad as I thought it'd be. And so I just. Kind of try to put myself in that mindset, like why not? Yeah. For everything new that I tried and eventually it just, it kind of stopped caring what people thought. Right. I know half the stuff I post is cringy, but I'm like, it's whatever. Like I'm doing what I love and I don't really Yeah, exactly. Love

Chris:

it. So networking. How have you grown your network? Cause I know you're, you're more on social media, but for people like us mm-hmm. Who have small businesses how would you suggest like, growing your network? Cause I know when I was rolling social media page for my store, it was like, oh, just follow people and like their pages. I'm like, I don't have time to scroll through my store's page to like other people's. I can't even like my own stuff.

Tyler:

And that might have worked like seven years ago too. That's true. It doesn't really work anymore.

Angela:

Yeah. I'll be honest, I really never followed many of like the rules of how to grow your network on social media or anything like that. I, if I were to give advice to somebody like you, it'd probably be different than what I would give to my team who is more using social media. Right. But, I think for you guys it's really gonna be a network of your network type of thing. Mm-hmm. Okay. So even just asking people to share, like people that you're interviewing on here, not just share to their social media, but actually like ask them to tell people about it. Ask them to ask their friends to listen to it and if they like it, then share it. Right. That's kind of how a lot of people have grown network marketing businesses as well. They've just talked to people and talked to people and talked to people and always brought it up. And I think a lot of the time, if you guys have ever heard of the curse of knowledge mm-hmm. like the more you know, the less or less good you are or the worst, you explain it to other people. Yeah. Okay. If you just, I think we as business owners think we get really repetitive mm-hmm. but truth is a lot of people don't know what you know. And a lot of people are more than willing to listen and hear you out and may or may not be interested, but you don't know unless you ask.

Chris:

See, no one's actually said that to me before. And it makes plenty of sense cuz I have all these new people at work and they're like, oh, so how do you do this? And I'm like, how do you not know how to do that? Yep. Right. It's not

Angela:

hard. Yeah. It took me awhile to learn that

Tyler:

lesson too. Yeah. I, there was something I had to learn fast in my business too. Just because you, you expect people that have been doing what they've been doing for as long as they have and they still don't know what you know, because you went to school for it or you've been doing it for so long and every single day where more, more importantly than anything. So if you talk about something every single day on your social media, of course you know it. Yeah. As opposed to someone who just happens to come across it once or twice.

Angela:

Exactly. I think I, I learned that lesson from social media too, realizing that not everybody is watching your story every single day, you know? Right. I'm not watching my friends' stories every day. Yeah, I'm skipping half it is And they're like, did you see this? And I'm like, no. But then I'm think, oh, you didn't see my stuff either, so why not talk about it again today? Right. I might be over it, but other people might not have seen it. Well, and

Chris:

I realize this too because like with the podcast, I post stuff and I assume that all of my friends just will listen to our podcast. And then I'll mention something and they're like, what are you talking about? Mm-hmm. like, didn't you listen to episode? No.

Angela:

Yeah. If you think of somebody when you recorded one, just shoot it to them. I'm sure they'll listen.

Chris:

See, I have to remember that I started getting better at like using my calendar app to like send myself reminders of things just so I can do it. Cuz I'm really good at being like, oh, I can remember this. And then I. It's like, I don't want to do that anymore.

Angela:

Yeah. My phone is my assistant Yeah.

Chris:

I mean, can you write it off on taxes if you use your phone as your assistant? Yeah. Yeah.

Angela:

What? Yeah, I think it's like up to 50% of your phone bill. Mm-hmm.

Tyler:

So my other question is then you said how you kind of fell off the bandwagon a little bit after you kind of had to have discipline for yourself. Mm-hmm. So what have you learned and what have you implemented to kind of hold yourself accountable?

Angela:

Oh, absolutely. Something I'm super passionate about actually, because I had to learn less in the hard way. Yeah. Is time blocking. Okay. So, and now that I'm working for somebody else, again, I have to track my time. So it's actually made it a lot easier to then just continue tracking my time into the business tasks that I do. Mm-hmm. but I will pretty much just set a timer for anywhere from 20 to 45 minutes. It holds me accountable to taking breaks in between whatever I'm working on. If I know it's gonna be something that should take a few hours, I'll set a 45 minute timer to focus on that thing and like, really not be distracted. Yeah. I mean, like, put my phone away, like coffee and water and whatever drinks I need or like set up, I'm not like going to snack or whatever. And then make sure I take like a little break in between just to reset my mind, especially if I'm switching task to task. Mm-hmm. having that break in between really helps you to get focused on the next thing and. Get the run over of whatever you were working on previously.

Tyler:

Right. That was something when I got into my current business, my full-time job now, one of the coaches that I had really suggested to is in between each task, schedule yourself 15 minutes of like, not relaxation time, but just a break time. Mm-hmm. because odds are either something happened that needs to be done in that time, or you need to do something or you need time for yourself within that time. Yeah. And then the other good piece of advice he gave me too was your calendar blocks for actual tasks only come in 30 minute increments. Mm. So even if there's something that, you know, is only gonna take like 10 minutes, put 30 minutes down mm-hmm. because there's lead up time to that, there's the time to do that and the time to get out of it. Yeah. And it was like you set yourself up for failure. If you're not building in extra time for yourself, if you're leaving yourself minute to minute make sure you leave

Angela:

some time. That was, that was my fatal flaw in the first couple years of owning a business was I was just so. I wanted success so badly. Mm-hmm I was just more than willing to burn myself out over and over again to get there. It honestly, it impacts like your relationships, it impacts the people around you at the end of the day and they don't. Oh for sure. You don't get quality anymore. I was living with my parents at the time too and I'm sure it annoyed them so much. they're like, just sit down for dinner. I'm like, no, I gotta go work

Chris:

Which randomly makes me think there's a thing for all of us people who are ADD is all get out and I saw as an app, it's either an app or just a dice, but like each thing, like you roll the dice and it says, Hey, 15 minutes and then you use it, do whatever task it is for 15 minutes and he roll it again and tells you how much time to do for the next task.

Angela:

I think I have those dice. I don't know that I've ever used them, but somebody got them for me for Christmas one year. They were thinking for you? Yeah. Yeah. I probably should have used them cause I'm pretty sure I got them before I used Learned that lesson,

Chris:

Oh, I love it. Yeah. Nothing. I thought you had another one. So I was Oh, okay. So onto the randomness of that is what I'm here for. Amazing. All the random stuff. Love it. What is your second favorite place you've traveled to?

Angela:

Oh,

Chris:

totally off. I like to take you away for a little bit, like the breaks and then break you back.

Angela:

I'm here for it. I'm here for it. Second favorite. That, that is such a hard question. I usually like to take South Africa off the table cause I'm so biased cuz that's where I'm from. Right. But I would probably say second favorite is Puerto Rico. Okay. Yeah. When we went there, we, it was, I think we went in 2014, something like that. Oh no, 2016. 2016 was when we went and we went for spring break. It's kind of crazy. It's my second favorite place cuz I got the Norovirus when I was there. Oh no, not a good time. We were sick half the time we were there. We ended up in the hospital like not fun but Oh wow. The fun days. I got to really get like immersed in the culture. Like we met a lot of the local people. We were in Ring Cone and they were just so cool and so artsy and we went to all these little markets and stuff and it was just like, you're exactly what you expect. A little like, almost like South American town to be like. Very similar to Costa Rica, which is my number one favorite

Tyler:

That's

Chris:

a fun place. Yeah, I had to mess with you cuz if he's saying number one, that's what everyone is expecting,

Angela:

so I Right. I'm having a hard time comparing it to Ireland since I just got back from there and that was, Way better than I expected. Like really? Yeah. It was like a little fairy tale land. It was so interesting.

Tyler:

Did you go over there just for fun or was there a reason to Ireland?

Angela:

So my boyfriend's family is all very Irish and she plans a family trip for us each year. And this year she was like, all right, we're doing the heritage trip. Both of his grandparents passed away last year. Oh wow. We're gonna go check out the homeland. And she is just an incredible trip planner. Like, I mean, she had everything down to the tea with like the coolest places to stay in the coolest restaurants to go to. Yeah, we had some chill time, we had some adventure time. It was awesome. That's,

Tyler:

so what's different about switching up a little bit again about South Africa. So what, or, or what's, I guess would be probably a better question, but what makes it different than here and what do you enjoy versus here?

Angela:

Oh, Wilmington or like the us

Chris:

We'll go with Wilmington first.

Angela:

Okay. So similarities is beach town super chill vibe, like mm-hmm. people are nice. I think my boyfriend always jokes, so when he came to North Carolina that he thought people were messing with him when they would like open the door for him or like, like I hope you have a nice day cuz he is from New York, Oh yeah, yeah, I get you. And so it was like what, what are you guys doing? But that's kind of why I fell in love with it here. I just, it reminded me of home. Differences is definitely the landscape, like the literal landscape, mountains into the ocean in South Africa is just like, there's nothing like that to me. It's absolutely gorgeous. But it's a lot more unsafe there. Like it is one of the highest crime rates in the world. Oh, wow. If not, it was the highest for a while in Cape Town too, which is where I'm from. Mm-hmm. Yeah. So kind of a little bit more hypervigilant being around there. Yeah. But it, there's nothing that can compare to it to me, like I grew up around it, so it's not like Right. Just normal. Yeah. It kind of feels normal, I feel at home there.

Chris:

Wait, there's mountains in South Africa. Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Everywhere. I mean, I'm gonna sound like a dut. I legit didn't know there were mountains in South

Tyler:

Africa. This is a weird plug, but just go with it. You have to find the bucket list episode on Dude. Perfect. because they went to South Africa and it was a pretty amazing documentary that they had. What's Dude Perfect? It's a big YouTube. It's mostly for like teenage boys that watch it, but it, they had some really interesting stuff, especially their bucket list series is really interesting. But they did a full one in South Africa and did a bunch of different things and they show a lot of the landscape there. And that was like mind blowing to me. Cause I didn't know that before. I saw that

Angela:

YouTube. Yeah, there, one of the wonders of the world is Table Mountain, which is in Cape Town.

Chris:

Didn't know that. Yeah. Yeah. I mean I knew that there were hills and valleys, but I didn't know it when like down that way. The only reason I know this is because I watched Survivor G Bone. Oh yeah. And they were. One didn't realize how close they were cause mm-hmm. have you ever seen Survivor?

Angela:

I've seen it. It's one of my, it's my best friend's, like favorite show. So I'm usually around when it's on, but I don't really follow what goes

Chris:

on. I didn't either until Covid hit, we needed to watch something But like in GBO there's literally a spot where they're like, Hey, you know, we took them to the beach and then they came back and they were literally set up in the, like the Rolling Hills, full greenery. And I'm like, what on Earth?

Angela:

Yeah. That's probably one of the coolest things about South Africa is you can drive a couple hours and get any view you want. Desert Mountains, green Valleys, beach,

Chris:

all of it. So is it similar to California then? Yeah. Okay. Yeah.

Tyler:

That's

Angela:

interesting. Yeah. Kind of makes me wanna go back to California. Right. But I like the small town vibe of Wilmington a little too much.

Tyler:

Yeah. You can't find that too often in California, at least the places that you'd wanna stay. No,

Chris:

it's very busy there. So a lot of smog.

Angela:

That too true. Yeah. My sister still lives out there. I actually went there a couple weeks ago. Oh, okay. Yeah. Nice. Right after Ireland. Yeah,

Tyler:

Yeah. You kind of had just like trip after trip after trip for a while, which is why it took us a while to get this set

Angela:

up. Yeah. It usually goes like that. I'll plan one trip and then I'm like, why not stop here and then here and then here. And then I'm like, all right. No traveling for two months at least like chill out. I got back and I was not gonna travel and now me and my best friend are going to the mountains in a couple weeks, so Oh, nice. And I'm going to New York. Oh geez. In Vermont. And you're just in Vegas. I dunno what's wrong with me. Yeah. And then I went to Vegas. Yeah,

Chris:

you were saying something. Oh yeah.

Tyler:

Yeah, I thought of another random question while we were talking about South Africa for some reason. So you're talking about burnout and everything as well too. So what do you do now to relax and get away?

Angela:

Beach, I go to the beach 100%. Me and my friends, they're gonna crack up if they listen to this, they hear me talking about this. It's a post to listen to this. I was gonna, yes, I'm absolutely sharing with your network. Hundred percent. But we called ourselves the sun worshipers this summer because we made it like a mission every day to go to the beach for at least 20 minutes. Oh wow. So all summer long. Not that it happened every single day, but we really went almost every day. And that just like being at the beach. The water. Yeah. Sand, sun. There's nothing that can relax you more than that, in my opinion.

Tyler:

Yeah, it is definitely a very grounding experience Exactly. Out there. I agree.

Chris:

So, Because I like to take his rabbit trail and just go down a little bit. When it comes to burnout, besides going to the beach, because not everybody who listens to us is near a beach. Mm-hmm. We do still have one random listener who lives in the middle of the Europe. Cool. Do we know who that is? No. They could just be using a a vpn

Tyler:

if you do live out there, find us on Instagram.

Chris:

Yeah, hit us up, So what other suggestions might you have? I mean, we'll pay you for a minute. like what else?

Angela:

Do you have suggestions? So for the people who took my program, I mean, I had a whole eight week process that we work through. Right. Okay. About four weeks of that was translating what they were learning in. Kind of confidence mindset wise into their social media presence. But the first four weeks was really like getting kind of reflection work. Like I think a lot of us burn ourselves out because our expectations are too high for ourselves or because of experiences we've had that have created beliefs in us about how things should be. And I kind of just challenge people to reevaluate what their priorities are. A lot of us, you know, are working to be successful so that we can spend more time with our family, or so that we can have more time to go to the beach or do the things that relax us. But what we don't realize is that the things that relax us and the things that fulfill us, those are the things that give you energy to be successful, right? So those come first. So for somebody who might be struggling with burnout right now, I would just challenge them to take a step back and look at everything from a broader, more macro perspective and realign their priorities. There's a little like kind of quiz thing that I work some of the girls through called oh shoot, I'm totally blanking on the name now. It'll, it'll come to me at some point. I'll tell you guys what it's called, if it's But essentially what it does is it asks you questions that you rate your answer on a scale of one to 10. About your finances, about your lifestyle, about your career or your business, about your family, your friends. And then I think the other two are spirit, did I say spirituality? I don't know. There's seven areas. Yeah. Okay. And so you essentially rate those, you get a number for each, and then you put them on this grid that shows you which areas might have, where you're, you might not be as happy with as you are with the other areas. So maybe you're really successful in your career, but your family and friends or your relationships are struggling. You can literally see that in a picture. And, and so that's one of the first things I do with them and it helps us to kind of figure out where they need to be investing more of their time or more of their energy. Because very often that's probably the thing that's draining you and is impacting the other areas of your life. So I think a little reflection work can go a long way.

Chris:

Yeah. Oh, for sure. Random keeping. Like we say, I always say random and it's really not So when it comes to learning things when you're educating other people, how do you learn best?

Angela:

I'm very much a podcast listener. Yeah. I love to read books and stuff, but I get very easily distracted. I don't know that I'm a ed, but I would kind of assume so. I just, my friends are always like, you are just, you know, a little squirrel mind half the time. But I definitely have like the auditory learning type thing. So I'm audiobooks, podcasts, anything somebody recommends I listen to. Like whether it's a friend or a mentor or anybody, I'm just like, yeah, let me give it a listen. I pretty quickly get sucked in

Tyler:

Interesting. Something I wanted to bring up too, when we were talking about especially the burnout and having your own business and everything mm-hmm. we talked about this and a past podcast, but what do you do to celebrate the wins along the way?

Angela:

So this is very interesting to me because I was always told, like, set a small goal and then give yourself a small reward. Mm-hmm. but it never worked for me. Like, I was like, okay, I'm gonna hit this goal. I'm gonna buy myself AirPods, I'm gonna do this, I'm gonna do that. And at the end of the day, it, it's just like the freedom, like the more successful I am, the more flexibility and freedom I have, and it's having a vision of what I want that freedom to look like. Mm-hmm. that has kept me going. So like, just always having something to look forward to, no matter what it is, doesn't necessarily have to be like, okay, I'm going to reach this goal, have an extra. Thousand bucks to take a trip or something like that. That just never like computed in my mind. So it was really like picturing experiences that I wanna have. That's interesting. And then kind of setting up like my goals around what would support those experiences, three, six months, a year, five years from now.

Tyler:

I think that's gonna be another question that I like to implement into these, just because I like that one Yeah. Just because everyone has a different purpose in life. Yes. Mm-hmm. and one person's when is gonna look different than another's. Mm-hmm. Yes. And then the way you celebrate that when is gonna be different as well too. So it's very interesting. Cause I figured it wasn't gonna be like a standard if this then that for you. Yeah. Because it didn't, because I'm, I'm the same way. Yeah. That it doesn't make

Angela:

sense to me. What has your business coach said about it?

Tyler:

My business coach primarily focuses around purpose. Mm. So having a very strong. To the core purpose. And no matter what you're doing, you're working towards that building, that legacy of the purpose that you have. So almost everything that you do is a win. Yeah. Is the way that he kind of puts it. I love that. So it's a great way of looking at things. Yeah. So the way that you said it is very similar. Mm-hmm. to what he was saying too. So like your purpose is having that ability to spend time with your friends and family. Mm-hmm. and that free time and flexibility to do that. So everything that you do along the way is leading up to your purpose and continuing to contribute to it. Yeah. Yeah.

Chris:

Interesting.

Angela:

Mm-hmm. helps you feel fulfilled too, I'm sure. Yeah, definitely. Fulfillment will keep you going more than

Tyler:

anything. Yeah. And it was funny too because when you start looking like really deep inside yourself too, cuz like at first it's like what's your purpose? And. For me, I was like, oh, I have kids. Like my purpose is my kids. And so like, that's a good purpose to have. Mm-hmm. but you have to look even deeper on like, than just that. And so when I had chance to like, sit down and actually go through his like, full coaching program before I started like actually using him as a coach mm-hmm. Just finding out what that was and how to build upon it makes, makes a huge

Angela:

difference. So I'm so curious now, what did you come to?

Tyler:

Yeah. So even though it was, my purpose is still my kids mm-hmm. but the deeper part of that is my dad grew up in an area and with a family that had almost nothing. And what he wanted to do was to provide me an opportunity to not have to build out of that. So my purpose is to continue his legacy, to build that standard, even a step higher for my.

Angela:

It's very, very similar to my family story. Really? Yeah. My dad was absolutely brought us to the US to like give us more opportunity and Oh wow. It's working out so far. So hopefully I can do that when I have kids one day, That's

Chris:

awesome. So we were talking about like giving your kids a leg up which I was chatting with a lot of teachers the other day. I feel like a lot of parents nowadays were like, you know, I don't wanna do what my parents did, whether it be like not have enough money or my parents spanked me or like punished me in a certain way. And this is gonna be totally random cuz I'm assuming you don't have kids yet, but Tyler does. Yeah, see making an assumption doesn't always make an ass So do you think the way your parents raised you is going to be a mindset in how you raise your kids?

Angela:

Definitely. Yeah. I think my. Both of my parents are very driven, very creative, and entrepreneurial. And that's one thing I recently, now as an adult, a lot of, a lot more people have pointed out to me that they just, they're, they're very entrepreneurial. They're always kind of looking at like how they can make things better, how they can serve people more, how they can create a better lifestyle for not only themselves, but the people around them. They, they're just honestly incredible people. And I think that's something that most people, I don't know if it's here in the US or if it's everywhere, and I've just been here so long, I've seen it here more. Mm-hmm. is, a lot of people grow up in a like system where you're expected to, you know, go to school, go to college, get a job, get married, have kids, get the household, all the things. Yeah. And That's pretty much what my parents did, but it, they just had a, a different mindset about kind of what's out there. And I'm really passionate about encouraging people to see more of what's out there and if, whether it's opportunity or the world or just not getting stuck in kind of what you do and kind of always being open to new things. That's something I really, really want my kids to, my future kids to appreciate as much as they did.

Tyler:

You bring up a good point too that that I was thinking of. So what do you think is different about your perspective living in the United States now since you have the perspective of living elsewhere mm-hmm. that's different than someone who's just left here their whole life.

Angela:

That's kind of a hard question because I don't think, I mean, Wilmington's a little bit of a melting pot. Yeah. And depending on where you live in the US cause I've lived in California, I've lived Raleigh, which is very different to Wilmington. Yeah. And my boyfriend's from New York, so we're up there all the time. Mm-hmm. I would probably say something different about people in every area. True. Will you repeat the question?

Tyler:

Yeah. How do you think your perspective is different being in the United States than people that have lived here their whole lives?

Angela:

Okay. So I wouldn't necessarily put on people that lived here their whole lives. It may people that have never traveled to a country abroad mm-hmm. or maybe not even traveled too far outside of their hometown. Okay. I think you have a whole different appreciation for people mm-hmm. And mm-hmm. and how different they are and their perspectives on things. Now in my like adult life, I've really learned to just be kind of more open to learning about. Other people are into and what they know that I don't know and experiences they've had that I haven't had. And I think for my friends that haven't traveled at all and even for me, just I learned this later in life, is just to kind of be less judgmental of people and know that your beliefs aren't necessarily what everybody else believes and they have their beliefs for a reason, and it's not your place to really have an opinion about that. Honestly. You can have conversations about him, but not to like kind of push what you think on others. That's, it's hard to have that perspective if you don't ever, if you only see one group of people often or you're only in one culture so often, you know? Yeah.

Tyler:

You're bring a good point in with the Joe Rogan podcast that you brought up earlier. Uhhuh He had. Matt Wal Sean recently, and they disagreed very heavily on a topic. And it was interesting too, because even though they did completely disagree, they weren't trying to convince the other to believe what they believed. They were just having an open conversation of why they had the viewpoint that they had. Mm-hmm. And I think that's very important to have especially nowadays is having an open discourse and, and an open mind. Mm-hmm.

Angela:

It's one of the things I appreciate about Joe Rogan a lot. Right? Yeah.

Tyler:

bring on anyone from any side and willing to talk to him and have that conversation. Yeah. No,

Chris:

still never listen to his podcast. You don't really

Tyler:

listen to podcast in general though? I do. Oh, you do? Yeah. Well, your gaming podcast, so it's always, it's only one, right? Or is there multiple

Chris:

that you listen to? No, it's always interesting because we were talking about this a while ago, about just the different things that we listen to. Mm-hmm. in life, and you listen to a lot of podcasts. My drive to work is. 15 to 20 minutes. Mm-hmm. So it legitimately, like I listen to one podcast about legal legends and just con content about that. And it is a hour and a half, two hours long. So it takes

Tyler:

me, geez, it takes you a whole week,

Chris:

Yeah. It takes me two to three days to finish it. And so it's like, ugh. And when I do, I'm like, what is the next thing to listen to? And

Angela:

you don't know what they're, you probably don't remember what they're talking about the next time you listen to it.

Chris:

Oh no, that's easy enough cuz it's like it's hilarious cuz it's called Hotline League and one, we can never do this cuz it's, I've watched them enough to know that it's a, a shit show to that. Yeah. But they, it's, there's two guys and they us they might have a guest on and then they chit chat and they have a discord server where they bring on people and let them ask questions and like post topics and they. Have discourse about that and they interesting. And so that's why it's like two to three, like one and a half to two hours because they're always bringing on somebody and then conversations get really long, but it always changes. So it's kind of cool.

Angela:

I don't think Joe Rogan's gonna be the move for you then cuz his are like an hour to five. So like a crazy hour sometimes. He's my road trip. Listen, okay. Yeah. Yeah. Not really just sitting at home or driving around. Listen. See

Chris:

my road trip one, typically me and Emily will listen to music or we will listen to, is a hot dog a sandwich? Oh yeah. We will get into more detail on that in our next episode. I'll

Angela:

have to listen to that one cuz I'm so curious now. No.

Chris:

Emily watches Rent Link. Have you ever heard of them? Mm-hmm. They're from Buis Creek. Yeah, they're from North Carolina. Grew up here. Yeah. That's where Campbell, yeah. University. Yeah. They, they grew up here. They made a podcast and a YouTube channel got really big, I guess they're in California now. But they still always talk about coming back home and all this random stuff, but they do and try the stupidest foods and guesses. You have to check out their podcast. Yeah, I'll have to. But they, I hired a chef who used to work somewhere else and he like makes their food and he has his own podcast channel, but he's the one who does the hot dog a sandwich. It's just random conversations about does it have to

Angela:

do with hotdog and sandwiches? Oh, no. It's just a funny name.

Tyler:

Yeah. There is a controversial few topics. Okay.

Chris:

there's one about what is better? Chicken tenders or chicken nuggets. What's your opinion? Oh, no, what I'm

Angela:

asking you short. Oh, tenders a hundred percent. Really? Yeah.

Chris:

I'd. I mean, it depends on the situation.

Angela:

Yeah. Facts. The Dino nus are a big hit in my household lately. That's fair. That's

Tyler:

fair.

Angela:

And I hate them. There's

Chris:

gross. I mean, it's, it's literally just processed, like all the leftovers. So that's what's kind of nasty. But me and Emily go, had this debate, which is why I listened to that specific podcast. Mm-hmm. But yes, I'm a Tinder person. If I go to Chick-fil-A, I'm getting their tenders or their strips technically. Mm-hmm. Versus their nuggets. Mm-hmm. 90% of the time. So

Angela:

life hack, if you're at McDonald's, don't get the McChicken cuz they use the nugget like pink, what do it called? Like the pink sign? Yeah. In those, but if you get the sandwich, it's like white chicken breast. Yes.

Chris:

So much better. Interesting. But it's also more.

Tyler:

I mean, and the grand scheme

Angela:

of things mean if it's like midnight, I'll probably get a McChicken, like 2:00

Chris:

PM grand scheme of things. If I'm going to McDonald's, I'm being cheap. Just you,

Angela:

whatever. There's one right next to my house. I, I'm weak

Chris:

But yeah, I also listen, don't be sour. Yes. And the Whiskey and Wisdom podcast. I sure hope so.

Angela:

Find it on your app. right?

Tyler:

Spotify, please. Yes. Spotify's being weird lately and not giving us our listens. So press the download button. Yes.

Chris:

Eventually we'll have a video version. But that seems like year to a 0.5. Yeah, when I have the money.

Tyler:

Well, since we're talking about D and Huggies, we are getting close to the end of the podcast as well too. So if you were to tell your younger self one thing, what would it be?

Angela:

Oh. I think probably care less what people think about you, be yourself more. I think especially through business coaching. A lot of the things, I mean, women who were taking my program were some of them double my age. And it was so crazy to be teaching somebody who was so much more life experience than you. Something that I'm sure they've honestly probably learned so many times throughout their life, through experiences. But really kind of giving them just like a, a different perspective on why they believe the things that they do. And a lot of us have like, limiting beliefs from things that happen in our childhood. And when I look at my life, I've, there's been a lot of un, a lot more undoing honestly than doing to kind of feel like myself again and feel like I can show up in the world authentically feeling like I can. Communicate who I am and what I believe to other people without worrying about their judgment because I'm firm and kind of just like being myself and allowing others to do the same. So wish I had judged myself less growing up. Mm-hmm. and also not worried so much what people thought.

Tyler:

From that answer, it seemed like there might have been like a pivotal moment that taught you that was there

Angela:

A little bit. Maybe multiple of the same thing moving around the world. You're always in a new culture with people who dress differently than you. Talk differently than you. And every single time I moved it was, why do you talk the way that you do? Why do you dress the way that you do? Getting picked on a lot? And so the easiest thing that you learn how to do is to fit in and copy what everybody else is doing. And I think it wasn't honestly until. Postcollege that I really recognized that pattern and was like, I don't wanna be anybody around me anymore. I just wanna figure out who I am and show up that way.

Tyler:

Interesting. Yeah. That's amazing. There's people that live their whole lives, so I don't live that, that don't learn that. So that's amazing that you've kind of figured it's not easy,

Angela:

Yeah, exactly. That is good.

Chris:

So real random. Do you have a British accent?

Angela:

I do not. I can fake one sometimes, but I don't know. I get nervous when I try

Chris:

I mean, I didn't know. Cause your parents both come from areas that have some sort of British influence, so I didn't know if you had one like hiding in the closet. I

Angela:

had one growing up and again that like, why do you talk like that thing when I moved? When I lived in California, I talked to like a Californian. When I moved to North Carolina, it was all of a sudden little country in high school, And I've kind of settled. I'm like, I think this is just my voice now, unintentionally. But yeah, I was very much a little pully Bri when I lived in England.

Tyler:

That's funny. Side story real fast. So I actually grew up my first four years in North Carolina before I moved to Pennsylvania. So, and the people that watched me, my godparents now, They were from the south, so I had a southern twang when I moved up. Oh, that's to, that's funny. Pennsylvania at four years old and my parents had to not, so that was always fun too. And then when I went to kindergarten for the first time, my parents were like, finally he'll be around like a teacher that doesn't have this accent. Sure enough, this teacher moved up from Georgia. Oh, great. It had even more of a southern accent. So she was like, oh my little southern accent, And they're like, oh, so funny. No, he's not gonna learn anything. Nope.

Angela:

We pick up so much of the accents and even mannerisms of the people around us. It's so interesting. You gotta watch a year around. Sometimes you might just end up being just like him. Exactly. Yeah. That's what they say.

Chris:

So now they're brenty in. I just wanna say thank you. Thank

Angela:

you. I appreciate you guys asking me to be here. Of

Chris:

course. So if you wanna plug yourself, we'll always give it an option.

Angela:

So, skincare, haircare, girly. If you're looking for me, you can find me on Instagram. My handle is Angela Kayley. Kayley spelt kind of weird. K a y l e y. Dunno where my mom got that one from. But it makes sense to me. Yeah, it makes sense, but I've just never seen it anywhere else. Wow. So if you have it, maybe message me, let me know. We can be friends, right. But yeah, Instagram is pretty much where I show up the most. You can find me on stories. It's where I share most about my business as well. And if you're looking for skincare, hair care, new business opportunity, I'm an open book.

Chris:

Nice. Awesome. Thank you. So yeah, thank you guys for listening in. If you're listening today, wish me a happy birthday on social media. I will love that and know you actually heard my podcast. And happy Thanksgiving. Don't eat too much Turkey. And if you do, please do not try and do a Turkey trot. I am so happy I did not marry into one of those families. See,

Tyler:

yeah, Also look out, we are going to be doing giveaways for the next couple weeks leading up until Christmas. So look out for those. Make sure you follow, share, like all of the fun things on the social medias that'll get you more entries and we're giving out some pretty awesome whiskey along the way. So look out for those fo show.

Chris:

Yeah, sounds great. Yes ma'am. Cheers. Well thank you guys for having

Tyler:

me. Yeah. Thank you so much for coming on. We appreciate your time. Absolutely.

Chris:

Cheers. Peace.